Red Light Cameras Argued in MO Supreme Court Today

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Today the Missouri Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on cases involving the use of red light cameras and speed cameras in St. Louis city, Moline Acres, and St. Peters.

Click on this link to go to the Missouri Supreme Court website to read summaries of the cases being heard today in the Missouri Supreme Court.

One case involves the use of speed cameras in the city of Moline Acres (a St. Louis County suburb); the other two cases involve red light cameras in the city of St. Louis and the city of St. Peters.

Listen to Oral Arguments in the Missouri Supreme Court Red Light Camera Hearing

You can listen live to the attorneys’ oral arguments in these three cases by going to the Missouri Supreme Court website or by clicking on this link: //www.courts.mo.gov/page.jsp?id=1977. You can only use this link today to listen live to the oral arguments.

When Will the Missouri Supreme Court Issue its Ruling in the Red Light Camera Cases?

The Missouri Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments today by attorneys representing the parties in these red light/speed camera cases, but the Court is not expected to issue its rulings on these cases until the end of the year.

Should I Pay My Red Light Camera Fine?

I can not advise you regarding whether or not you should pay your red light camera ticket fine. The information that I provide in this blog post is general information and should not be considered legal advice because there is no attorney-client relationship created by your reading this blog post.

However, I can tell you that, if you pay your St. Louis city red light camera ticket fine now, it will be considered a voluntary payment. The city of St. Louis must put that money in escrow and can not use it until after the Missouri Supreme Court determines whether or not the St. Louis city red light camera ordinance is legal.

Will the Court Issue an Arrest Warrant if I Don’t Pay my Red Light Camera Fine?

For the past several years, the St. Louis City Municipal Court has had the power to issue warrants if drivers refuse to pay red light camera ticket fines, but the Court has not issued warrants in those cases. This appears to be a temporary policy that the Court has enacted and, therefore, the Court could decide to change its policy at any time and start issuing warrants for drivers who refuse to pay their red light camera fines.

What if the Missouri Supreme Court Rules that the Red Light Cameras are Legal?

If the Missouri Supreme Court rules that the red light cameras used by the city of St. Louis are legal, the city of St. Louis could pursue drivers who refused to pay red light camera fines and demand payment for the unpaid amount.

Will I Get a Refund if St. Louis City Red Light Cameras Are Ruled Illegal?

If the Missouri Supreme Court rules that the red light cameras used in the city of St. Louis are illegal, it is possible that the City would be forced to issue full or partial refunds to all drivers who have paid red light camera fines in the past. However, there have been other cities in the United States that were forced to quit using red light cameras but were not required to issue refunds.

The Missouri Supreme Court will decide whether the City’s red light camera law is legal and whether or not the City must issue refunds to those who have already paid red light camera fines.

 


If you have a Missouri speeding ticket that you want to get reduced to a non-moving, no-point violation, call St. Louis traffic law attorney Andrea Storey Rogers at (314) 724-5059 or email Andrea at [email protected] or [email protected] for a price quote and estimate of your fine and court costs.

 

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